GNPA Logo
Search...
Generic filters
Filter by Categories
ARCHIVES
HOME PAGE
ABOUT
Chapters
Chapter Talk
Conservation
Spotlight on Conservation
Current Partner Projects
Conservation Resources
Conservation Photography
Make Your Photographes Matter
Citizen Science Projects
Competitions
Competitions Preparation
Competition Winner Galleries
Education
GNPA Webinars
Through the Lens
Social Media Tips
Tips and Tricks
Election
EXPO
From The President
Gear
GNPA News
Meet a Member
Member Resources
Membership
Newsletter
Post Processing
SHOOT WITH US
Through the Lens
WHATS HOT
Where to Shoot Now
GNPA Officers | Board | Chairs
Sitestuff
Sitestuff GNPA Board & Officers
Sitestuff Contact Us
Sitestuff Chapter Coordinators
Sitestuff Chapter Locations part 1
Sitestuff Chapter Locations part 2
Sitestuff - Recommended Pros
HIDDEN

By Emil Powella

Have you ever told yourself that if you could travel to exotic destinations, you’d be able to shoot the kind of amazing photographs that you see on social media? Well, for most of us, the opportunity to visit exotic places is seldom possible. But we can all photograph somewhere close to home, and we can all find great photographs.

Like many of you, I live in a conventional subdivision. I do enjoy the luxury of having trees behind my house, but most everything else is pretty normal. As a photographer, my challenge was to utilize what I had in order to set up a fun bird studio.

My backyard photography is mostly songbirds with the occasional hawk or owl venturing in. My wife, Nancy, has been a lifelong birder, and she has feeders filled with good seed strategically placed to attract different kinds of birds. We also maintain several birdhouses that attract a lot of bluebird activity, as well as hummingbird feeders during the hummer season.

Some of the ideas I used for this studio came from a YouTube video posted by David Akoubian.

My deck is at second-story level, which puts me looking into the trees at about 25 feet up. That’s where I’ve created my bird studio. I’ve salvaged several tree limbs I found in the woods and attached them to my deck, creating staging areas for the birds as they wait their turn at the feeders.

There are trees about 25 feet behind the deck, which is far enough away to add a soft-focus background to my images. I don’t have as sophisticated a setup as David, but I still am able to create quality photographs that I enjoy sharing with others. In fact, my photos have been used by conservation organizations such as the Keep Georgia Beautiful Foundation, a group for which I serve as the point of contact as part of my responsibilities as a GNPA Conservation Committee member.

These photos will show how I’ve fixed some of the limbs in place and provided multiple natural-looking places for the birds to land.

Deck, looking into the woods.

Deck, looking into the woods.

 

Closeup of limbs attached to the deck.

Closeup of limbs attached to the deck.

 

Closeup of limbs attached to the deck.

Closeup of limbs attached to the deck.

You can also create resting places for birds at ground level, just by mounting a few vertical logs or limbs to metal posts that can’t be seen by the camera.. Strategic placement of the limbs will help deliver excellent photo opportunities.

Regardless of your setting, these concepts can be adapted pretty easily. Give the birds comfortable places to land and stage as they wait to get to the feeders. Observing and learning their habits will make you much more prepared to get the shots you want.

I’m able to photograph birds in the trees behind the deck, as well as those that pose on the limbs I’ve positioned. I can also photograph birds on the deck from inside the house in my kitchen as well. Sometimes that feels a little like cheating, but in rough weather it can sure be nice.

So don’t give up planning and hoping to go to exotic bird photo locations. But while you’re waiting, have fun with the challenge of adapting your deck or yard into a working studio and hone your bird skills right there at home.

As you do, please consider donating photos to our GNPA conservation partners such as Keep Georgia Beautiful and the Wildlife Resources Division of the DNR. These organizations need good photos of local wildlife, and GNPA members can be a valuable resource for them. Plus, members receive credit whenever those photos are used.

 

Emil Powella is a GNPA member who lives in Lilburn. He serves as the co-coordinator of the Decatur Chapter.

 

 

1
^ BACK TO TOP ^